RHS Garden Harlow Carr

Star Travel Rating

5/5

Review type

Things to do

Location

RHS Garden Harlow Carr

Date of travel

July, 2020

Product name

Product country

Product city

Travelled with

Family including children under 16

Reasons for trip

I visited Harlow Carr Gardens with the family and have written a general review “here.”:http://www.silvertraveladvisor.com/review/attraction/204553-review-rhs-garden-harlow-carr I came back with loads of pictures – too many to include in one review, so have decided to write more detailed reviews of the different parts of the garden with more pictures. This describes the woodland walk.

Stretching up the slope beyond the stream is an attractive area of mixed woodland, which covers about half the total area of the gardens. It is planted with mainly native deciduous trees along with a few conifers and ‘exotics’. A network of well made paths leads through the woodland to the ruined Doric columns in the centre of the woodland area. These were originally part of the entrance to the pump room of Harrogate Spa, but after being dismantled were erected at Harlow Carr in 1964. There is a good view down to the main border through the trees from here.

At the most northerly point of garden is the Arboretum, an open area planted with exotic tree species.Beyond it is the Bamboo Glade with over 200 species of bamboo. The bird hide is tucked away here as well as an apiary.

When the Northern Horticultural Society first leased the area, much of the woodland was in poor condition. They cleared many dead trees and planted hundreds of Rhododendrons which thrived on the slightly acidic soils. These flower from February to August, providing a welcome splash of colour. Many are now very large and venerable bushes and there are notices asking children not to climb on them. Instead, there is a children’s play areas with a “Logness Monster”:https://tinyurl.com/y4fbrlu4 and the “Craggle Top Tree House.”:https://tinyurl.com/yyyxtf9p

The undergrowth has been planted with thousands of snowdrops, bluebells and fritillaries to provide colour during the spring. In July there were splashes of colour from foxgloves and bistort growing along the paths.

ESW

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